artist spotlight
simone fezer

share your creative practice:
in conversation with simone fezer

  • How does multi-influences translate into your art practice? 
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  • Pretty directly. Multi-influences reflect the diversity of our existence and are as such represented in my work, celebrating diversity and ambiguity. 
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  • Has this changed the way you approach your work? 
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  • I don ́t know if it has really changed my approach, I guess my work has rather been growing with it. I have been learning about many different mediums and am in love with knowledge in general, am not really fond of easy answers, (other than in technical questions) and love to show the amazing complexity of our world,- so maybe, and naturally, the older I get the more complex my work gets…and different mediums express different things. 
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  • What initially captured your imagination about glass? 
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  • Initially I think, it was the amazing intensity of glass-making. I remember standing there, transfixed, outside of the Hotshop in Frauenau, and could not wait to get my hands on it. This has definitely got me started on my determined search for ways to learn about glass. Since then I have met many amazing people, and learned about the wonderful diversity of glass and the ways to work with it, but it all started there. 
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  • What’s the significance of the handmade to you? 
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  • I still believe that each handmade work speaks about all that went into it,- all the love, the dedication, the pain in the ass, the dexterity, the skill, all the thought and knowledge. A machine-made thing will speak about itself as being machine- made, so in a conceptual context I would have to use it differently. Then of course there is the big importance of preserving and keeping the skills and all the century old-knowledge of working with our hands alive. It truly is a heritage of humankind that must not be lost. Besides that I believe that working with our hands is vital for our sanity, for us being human, we are creatures of this earth and we need to touch and feel and shape with our bodies to stay sane and to not loose the connection to where we come from. 
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  • What was your route to becoming an artist?
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  • Not a planned one, at least not by my conscious self. But looking from the outside it seems pretty obvious now. I just kept going and making. 
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  • What is your chosen medium and what are your techniques? 
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  • I do love glass, but I also love steel and textile and wood and things that glitter, and I love nature, I do not like to limit myself in saying I work only with certain mediums, because when something new comes up, that requires new means of expression, I will go and look for them and use them. Lately I have come to working with and in my beloved nature directly, working with photography and film. What has become ever more important to me, -and what has always been supported by my lack of money-, is sustainability, and using old and recycled materials as much as possible. 

I blow, I sculpt, I cast, I do Pâte de Verre, I cut up sheet glass and mirrors, I fuse and paint and break, and use it to reflect or contain, because glass is so many things and can speak about so much in so many different ways… 

 

  • How would you describe your work and where do you think it fits within the sphere of contemporary glass? 
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  • My reference-point is not necessarily contemporary glass, but contemporary art. Maybe I am rather pushing the limits of what glass can be within the art world, helping it out of the box of glass-art, into the bigger world of art as “just another medium” but as one with the amazing range of possibilities only glass artists are aware of. I guess I am contemporary in how I approach the material; asking questions conceptually and working idea based.; always questioning and revising the use of any medium. Pushing the boundaries and being open for new ideas and things. 
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  • Tell us a bit about your process and what environment you like to work in? 
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  • Outside! Lately I noticed that I have been working too much again, and not spent enough time in my home: nature and the woods, so I thought, well, If you can ́t stop making art, then the only way is to go out and make art in the woods. So that ́s what I have been doing more and more lately, and that I will continue to do. But other than that I actually like working among other people, I have always been working at schools, or at home with my kids, or wherever I am at the given moment, in-between everything else..Mostly I am very low tech., but do love myself a well equipped hot-shop with a large team!!! 
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  • Who do you look up to when it comes to aesthetics? 
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  • Oups, many. Some I look up to technically, am amazed and fascinated by the beauty, perfection or simplicity of their pieces, by the fluidity, the playfulness, the poetry, or the sheer and overwhelming presence of the work and know at the same time that it ́s not me. There ́s so many great artists out there within and without the glass-world! 
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  • What currently inspires you and which other artists do you admire and why? 
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  • I have been getting very interested in Thomas Hirschhorn for example, as someone who is creating stages or rather worlds for the visitor to enter and participate, which is a concept I like very much,-or in general people who work above and beyond genres, taking art out there, working on making us aware of art as a part of life, not locked up in galleries and special access sites. Art as intervention. 
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simone fezer

In her work Simone Fezer addresses the fragility and interdependency of all life and aims to create interdisciplinary and immersive environments that are alive and changing. She brings together installation, performance and multi-media, creating stages for the viewer to enter and explore.

discovery...